4.22.14.

get-motivation:

thinspoandnoserings:

ladycreep:

These happy frolicking cows are the best thing I’ve seen today! [video]

I couldn’t help it! It makes me too happy.

Need a smile? cause that made me smile!

(via allibunny)

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4.22.14.

oliviawhen:

Carmen Sandiego & Xena for sketch dailies on twitter! (I have a twitter now, which I use mostly for silly things and tough ladies.)

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4.22.14.

disneyforprincesses:

And without further adieu….our TOP FIVE BANNERS!

Thank you so much for everyone who participated!!!!!

Credit, from top to bottom:

  1. dmolech
  2. geenadoodles
  3. strawberryriddle
  4. cancersyndrome

We love these wonderful banners and we would love to be able to use all of them in the future!!

Later on, we will make a post of the rest of the submissions, which were all totally awesome and creative as well, so everyone else can see how awesome you guys are!!

THANK YOU SO MUCH!

***PLEASE DO NOT REMOVE CREDIT FROM THESE BANNERS. THESE ARTISTS WORKED HARD ON THEM AND THEY DESERVE TO GAIN RECOGNITION FROM IT!***

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4.22.14.
currentsinbiology:

Lack of breeding threatens blue-footed boobies’ survival
Blue-footed Boobies are on the decline in the Galápagos.
A new study appearing in the journal Avian Conservation and Ecology indicates numbers of the iconic birds, known for their bright blue feet and propensity to burst into dance to attract mates, have fallen more than 50 percent in less than 20 years.
The drastic drop in population is probably due to an unexplained disappearance of sardines from the Boobies’ diet, said Dave Anderson, a professor of biology at Wake Forest University and the study’s principal investigator. This in turn has adult Boobies electing not to breed. Without breeding, old birds die and are not replaced but new young adults, and the population shrinks.

Not just attractive physical features, the blue feet of this booby can be used to cover its chicks and keep them warm.  Photograph by Tim Laman

currentsinbiology:

Lack of breeding threatens blue-footed boobies’ survival

Blue-footed Boobies are on the decline in the Galápagos.

A new study appearing in the journal Avian Conservation and Ecology indicates numbers of the iconic birds, known for their bright blue feet and propensity to burst into dance to attract mates, have fallen more than 50 percent in less than 20 years.

The drastic drop in population is probably due to an unexplained disappearance of sardines from the Boobies’ diet, said Dave Anderson, a professor of biology at Wake Forest University and the study’s principal investigator. This in turn has adult Boobies electing not to breed. Without breeding, old birds die and are not replaced but new young adults, and the population shrinks.

Not just attractive physical features, the blue feet of this booby can be used to cover its chicks and keep them warm.  Photograph by Tim Laman

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4.22.14.

afrofabulous asked: Do you think that 28 is too old to try to pursue a career in art on your own terms? I wanted to be a 3D animator for as long as I can remember, but when I got to college I realized that going to college for it wasn't for me. The school and the environment was horrible and I was completely uninspired to continue animation. I went to school for fashion illustration after that and I although my teachers thought my art was truly beautiful, I didn't get to finish because I started a family.

rosalarian:

gastrophobia:

bigbigtruck:

(cont.) I became inspired again recently and I have been drawing and sketching everyday (for the past two years) as well as learning animation on my own. I am heavily influenced by your webcomic, but I just wanted to know if it was too late to pursue my dream without school and by myself at 28?

I started TJ and Amal at 31, with a weak art education and zero experience in comics, so you can probably guess where I stand on the matter!

I wish our culture didn’t place such heavy emphasis on “making it” in your teens and twenties; that the (justifiable!) attention paid to prodigies wouldn’t set “prodigy” as the norm.  This kind of BS does everyone a disservice.

If you have a dream and the resources/ability to pursue it, there’s no reason to sit it out just because “everyone makes it by 25.” Because everyone DOESN’T make it by 25. Some do, some don’t, whatever.
What’s more, age can bring experience that will inform your work — work you couldn’t have made at 20 or 25.

Sometimes when I get discouraged about this stuff, it helps to remember an anecdote I read a few years ago—
A retiree mentions to her friend that she’s considering going back to college and finishing her degree.
"What, at 65?" says her friend, "You’ll be at least 40 years older than everyone else in class!"
To which the lady replies, “oh, so you think I should wait till I’m 70?”

There’s no going backwards.

Good luck!

I started Gastrophobia at 31! Sounds like that’s the magic number! Wait three years and you’ll finally be ready to play with the grown ups, kid.

I got a very early start, coming out with my first webcomics when I was still a teenager. And everyone always told me how young I was to be so successful. And now there’s a new crop of people younger than me who are huge successes, and sometimes I catch myself feeling like I’m slowing down, and these whippersnappers are gonna leave me in the dust. And then I give myself a mental face-slap and remind myself my life is nowhere close to over and I have so much time ahead of me to keep going, and that’s awesome.

I just started a burlesque career a couple years ago. There are plenty of performers who started even older than me. Who knows how I’ll reinvent myself in another ten years? So much potential. My age has nothing to do with it.

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4.22.14.

hyacynthus:

adorablesnakes:

snake-lovers:

Dasypeltis sp.

Snakes are weirdos in the best possible way.

They actually break the egg using hypapophyses on the ventral side of their vertebral column - spines that stick out of the belly-side as seen in the photos below:

For more photos and videos of these wonderful snakes doing their derpy egg-cracking wriggle, I refer you to this excellent blog post here!

(Photos from Google Images)

(via butthurtherpetologist)

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4.22.14.

babyslime:

angelophile:

Katniss Everdeen photographed by starrfallphotography on Deviantart.

Cosplay by Aspen of White Rabbit Cosplay and Photography.

This is how I pictured Katniss when I read the books. <3

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4.22.14.
pixieidentifies:

Scientific Name: Veronica serpyllifoliaEnglish Name: Thyme-leaved SpeedwellSwedish Name: Majveronika
The Thyme-leaved Speedwell is a common angiosperm that can be found on most continents. In Sweden, they can be found throughout the country except for the more mountainous areas in the north. It’s a creeping plant and can be found on trails, grass lawns, roadsides etc.
The plant grows to a length of 5 to 25 centimeters, with small white to blue flowers bearing blue or purple stripes. 

pixieidentifies:

Scientific Name: Veronica serpyllifolia
English Name: Thyme-leaved Speedwell
Swedish Name: Majveronika

The Thyme-leaved Speedwell is a common angiosperm that can be found on most continents. In Sweden, they can be found throughout the country except for the more mountainous areas in the north. It’s a creeping plant and can be found on trails, grass lawns, roadsides etc.

The plant grows to a length of 5 to 25 centimeters, with small white to blue flowers bearing blue or purple stripes. 

(via theherbarium)

10

4.22.14.

sgwild:

Seraya or Dark Red Meranti (Shorea curtisii)

Seraya is a typical member of the Hill Dipterocarp Forest habitat which can normally be expected between 300 to 800 metres above sea level. in coastal areas (which includes Singapore), this locally Vulnerable species will occur at lower altitudes, such as in the Bukit Timah Nature Reserve where it grows gregariously on the primary forested ridge tops of the reserve.

Interestingly, a small cluster of Seraya occurs within the Central Catchment Nature Reserve, north of MacRitchie Reservoir. The forest type in which this cluster occurs is essentially Lowland Dipterocarp Forest, and in Peninsular Malaysia this species is not known to grow in Lowland Dipterocarp Forest. Although Seraya approaches sea level in coastal hill forests, of which Bukit Timah is an example, this well-known tree had never been reported prior to a 1994 study on the.tree communities of the Central Catchment Nature Reserve.

Genetic analysis of the Seraya population in the Central Catchment Nature Reserve confirmed its long isolation from the Seraya populations of Bukit Timah, as the trees did not show the same range of genetic variation as those from Bukit Timah. In all likelihood, Seraya in the Central Catchment Nature Reserve represent the last descendants of a larger Seraya population that occupied a series of ridges when the Central Catchment Area was an inland hill during the Pleistocene, when sea levels were over 100 metres lower than they are today.

from lowland dipterocarp forest prior to a report in 1994.

This is a large emergent tree with a straight, deeply fissured bole with short and stout buttresses. The leaves have ladder-like tertiary venation and are waxy and pale on the upper surface. This give the forest canopy a blue-green sheen.

Mass flowering appears to occur in about 9-year intervals. Flowers could be pollinated by thrips. The seeds of Seraya are poorly dispersed by wind, often falling near the mother tree.

Sources: Flora Singapura, The Digital Nature Archive of Singapore, Nature Society (Singapore) Discussion & Position Paper - Cross Island Line

Images: 1 by ‘Jungle Diary’; 2 by Edward Lim; 3 by Wang Luan Keng; 4 by Tan Beng Chiak; 5 by ‘Wakx’; 6, 8, 9 by Tony O’Dempsey; 7 by Chua Siew Chin;

(via theherbarium)

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